About Cherg

The Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) was established in 2001 by the World Health Organization (WHO) to provide external technical guidance and global leadership in the development and improvement of epidemiological estimates for children under five

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Projects

Micronutrient deficiencies and nutritional status Prior work has shown that deficiencies of micronutrients contribute to the global disease burden of young children and that interventions to prevent these deficiencies are identified as highly effective strategies

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Projects

Effect of co-morbidity on child mortality The standard practice of attributing each death to a single cause ignores the fact that many deaths are associated with more than one condition, often with two or more

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Steroids

Antenatal Steroids in Preterm Labour for Prevention of Neonatal Deaths LiST Project Page More Intervention Effect Estimate Summaries Reference Mwansa-Kambafwile J, Cousens S, Hansen T, Lawn JE.  Antenatal steroids in preterm labour for the prevention

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Projects

Intervention effectiveness to reduce maternal/child mortality As part of the current CHERG, working groups have been formed to do systematic reviews of effectiveness and efficacy of various maternal and child health interventions. These groups are

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Projects

Incidence and sequelae of maternal morbidity While there is some information available on the levels of maternal mortality in developing countries, much less is known about the levels of maternal morbidity, including the incidence of

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Projects

Measurement of intervention coverage Although UNICEF and other partners have invested heavily in efforts to track coverage levels for effective maternal, newborn and child (MNC) survival and nutrition interventions methodological weaknesses in current efforts to

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About CHERG

Background The Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG) was established in 2001 by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an independent source of technical expertise on child morbidity and mortality estimates at global and country

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